Camino Primitivo, Castro to A Fonsagrada, 21 km

I forgot to turn on my Wikiloc app this morning so this is a link to the same stage from 2017

The day starts fresh but dry. Very soon after leaving the albergue I am directed onto a track, which is lovely and soft due to the rain, but luckily not at all muddy. After quite some time there is a longish stretch on the main road and then back onto tracks again, rising ever higher towards the wind turbines which are whizzing around with some speed.

I have dressed as normal in shorts, sleeveless T-shirt, arm warmers and scarf across my shoulders – knowing that there is to be a continuous climb for the first 8 or 9 km and also knowing that I get hot and bothered during such an exertion. Nevertheless I do feel rather chilly for a while.

The day starts fresh but dry. Very soon after leaving the albergue I am directed onto a track, which is lovely and soft due to the rain. After quite some time there is a longish stretch on the main road and then back onto tracks again rising ever higher towards the wind turbines which are whizzing around with some speed.

It remains dull with some low cloud, and some threateningly dark cloud but remains dry for the time being. I made an early start (7-ish) hoping to miss as much of the forecast rain as possible, but still not as early as very many others who had already departed before me.

The sun fights its way through at 9 o’clock, and now I have the opportunity to catch raindrop photos. It is a morning of raindrops and wind turbines.

And suddenly I’m in Galicia again. It’s odd that I didn’t notice the Asturias/Galicia border marker that I saw on the previous occasion. Maybe I was too busy looking for raindrops.

Suddenly it becomes cooler and the breeze is brisker and very soon it starts to rain. It’s 10:30 and it continues to rain until I arrive at my destination at 12:00. It isn’t hard rain, more of a misty drizzle, but the sort that can soak you to the bones. I pull on my rain cover and it works almost perfectly. There will be a slight adjustment I will make but it does a very good job at keeping my pack and bum bag completely dry. And my arms are free so I don’t get too hot and bothered.

I find it incredible that I can manage to walk at a pace today of 4.7 km/h and that’s including a lot of dawdling to take photos in the first half of this walk. Once I stop I can hardly put weight on my knee and it takes quite a few moments in order to gain any normal use. I did take anti-inflammatories and painkillers and as long as I kept going I didn’t have any problems. Our bodies are truly incredible.

I’m staying once again at the Albergue Cantábrico. Such a treat to be supplied with cotton sheets, pillowcase and duvet. With an excellent kitchen and laundry facilities it’s worth every centimo of €15.

Still, wherever you are staying it’s not much fun in the rain. More of the wet stuff is due tomorrow, hopefully not too much and not for too long.

About magwood

Trepidatious Traveller - camino blog is about preparing for and walking the Camino de Santiago. Many future pilgrims have found the blog useful and inspiring, and many who have no plans to walk the camino have simply enjoyed the dialogue http://www.magwood.me
This entry was posted in Camino de Santiago de Compostela, Camino del Norte, Camino Primitivo. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Camino Primitivo, Castro to A Fonsagrada, 21 km

  1. That first drop image is spectacular! It looks like a beautiful track, despite looming rain.

    Like

  2. Glad to hear that your knee is managing OK. My normal Camino walking speed is about 4 km/h and I don’t consider myself slow at all! 🙂

    Like

  3. sixwheeler says:

    Great photos.

    Like

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