Camino Mozárabe – day 12 – Villaharta to Alcaracejos 38 km

We left the hostal this morning before 07:30 and walked to the nearby cafe to order a bocadillo each for lunch. I was also carrying a couple of oranges (already peeled to save weight), a couple of tomatoes, three biscuits and some nuts, together with 3 litres of water for our extra long stage today, as we would not pass by any sources of food or water until we arrive at our destination 38 km’s away. Three litres of water equals 3 kilos of weight so overall my pack was at least one and a half kilos heavier than normal. We set off on the road but were soon directed onto a track through meadowland and woodland.

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Today was a day of animals, the first we saw were in a shed near the beginning of the walk. The tracks varied a great deal including wide sandy paths, stoney slopes, rocky tracks, and a lot of water to negotiate our way around. But without exception our surroundings were beautiful from start to finish. We made planned stops every 10 km, when I removed my boots and socks and ate my supplies. Some of the going was very rough and hard on the feet, especially my poorly right foot which gave me a few twangs of brief pain throughout the day.

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I stopped to take so many photos of the surrounding splendour and could easily have taken many more but tried to restrict myself a bit. It was just so very lovely.

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At about 8 km we came across a high gate that was locked and surrounded by a barbed wire fence. Luckily there was a small portion with no barbs and we climbed over here. There was a lot of elevation on this stage as we crossed the Sierra Moreno hills (mountains?), but the last 10 km was fairly flat. The signage has been excellent today and for the past couple of days. From about the half way mark today we started to see granite marker blocks at very regular intervals and a lot of effort has been put into steering us in the right direction.

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About half way through the trek we came across a small holding where a charming old guy was tending his animals. He engaged me in conversation and seemed reluctant to let me go. I had to guess his age (77) and we talked about children and grandchildren before I noticed his black pigs roaming in the field behind us. He let two young ones out of the gate so that I could meet them properly. These black pigs are fed on the acorns of the holm oak which gives the meat a special (and very expensive) taste. The guys in the picture are around six months old and will be slaughtered at a year (if I understood correctly). He also had several dogs, sheep, a goat and a young horse. It was lovely to chat to him – this is something I have missed about this route so far.

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After our second break at 20 km I allowed myself to plug in and listen to a couple of radio dramas to try to take my mind off my aching feet and after the last break when we were on the home straight I tuned into my playlist to give myself a bit of a boost.

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The photos will speak for themselves as regards the terrain – the flowers were even more stunning than usual.

I have enjoyed wearing a sleeveless T-shirt the last couple of days. It is good to have my arms out, even if the bingo wings are a bit active. I even got my legs out today when I unzipped the bottoms from my walking trousers.

We actively walked for over seven hours and arrived at our destination around 16:30. I, for one, was absolutely knackered. We found accommodation in hostel El Parador and have been allocated a twin room each with ensuite for 15€. Excellent value. It took me a while to summon the energy to shower and wash my clothes and rig up a washing line outside my window.

I am now sitting in the bar with a glass of hideously sweet white wine. It seems impossible to buy s glass of simple dry white wine in this area. Most bars offer only ‘fino’ a sherry-like dry wine which makes me shudder almost as much as this sweet wine that I am drinking now. I shall have to change my drink until we reach a different area.

I will add facts and figures when I have more energy and patience – wordpress or wifi is not being very cooperative right now!

And here they are….
Distance according to notes (wikiloc stopped recording during the day) 38 km
Total distance walked 319 km, average 26.6 km per day

Today’s spend – bocadillo 3€, tinto de verano 1.20€, hostal 15€, dinner and drinks 8.50€. Total 27.70€
Twelve days total spend 306€

About magwood

Trepidatious Traveller - camino blog is about preparing for and walking the Camino de Santiago. Many future pilgrims have found the blog useful and inspiring, and many who have no plans to walk the camino have simply enjoyed the dialogue http://www.magwood.me
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22 Responses to Camino Mozárabe – day 12 – Villaharta to Alcaracejos 38 km

  1. David Wolfe says:

    “Well.done” you deserve a good nights sleep The animal pictures are great as are the rest and the obligatory scruffy little dog. Rest well and have an easy day tomorrow .

    Like

  2. Tony Rice says:

    What’s the silver clip on the pigs nose for?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I was wondering about the pigs nose clip too. Perhaps a collar/leash idea when they need to gather them up or keep them together? That was a long day in the boots Maggie, I hope your water held up. The good thing about a heavy pack with water, it only gets lighter as the day goes on. I’m pinching another one of your ideas with the peeled orange, good one! Hopefully a good nights sleep tonight in a room of your own and an easier day tomorrow. Loving your journey and your posts. They could make a calendar out of the photos you’re taking, fabulous!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. zohar says:

    What sort of a camera do you use? the pictures are too good for a cellphone cam. Don’t tell me you carry one of those 3 k’g machines with 5 kinds of lens….

    Liked by 1 person

    • magwood says:

      Zohar, see the questions and answers post of a couple of days ago where I give details. Panasonic lumix DMC-LF1 – I have enough technology weight – I don’t want to add with heavy camera gear.

      Like

  5. Sweet white wine. Ugh!
    Wonderful pictures, especially the flowers but all are stunning. Take care of you feet. ❤ ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  6. mary lynch says:

    Well done Maggie, you got there. I hope the feet are okay. I must say I’d prefer the fino to sweet white wine at the end of the day. Hope tomorrow is an easier day, rest well.
    Buen camino.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Janice Tyler says:

    What a star to do that walk in one go! I loved the idea of ready peeled oranges – very innovative. Lovely pix today and so glad you got your own en suite room. Sweet dreams.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Keith Rocks says:

    Well done Maggie. Great days walking. Lovely pics

    Liked by 1 person

  9. janpow123 says:

    Ouch…that sounded like a rough day, but well done you👏. Hopefully you won’t get too many of those along the way and today will be a good day for you.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Katherine Paterson says:

    Fabulous and fantastic, the pics and the achievement, enorabuena!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. heather coffin says:

    My feet are aching in sympathy Maggie. You definitely need a dry white wine after such a long day. Hope you can find something better to drink, after all, you do deserve it. xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Hope it’s a short day tomorrow! x

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Cathy Platin says:

    Great job Maggie. You are an inspiration! I have so enjoyed reading your blogs every day. Take care of those feet! Look forward to the next post…

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Susan Quenneville says:

    You are absolutely incredible, Maggie!! I get knackered after 17 km!! Hope you resolve your foot/feet issues. Buen Camino!!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. David High says:

    Hello Maggie,I think I can answer the question as to why pigs have rings through their nostrils,Pigs are very destructive animals and will wroot soil if given a chance looking for tasty roots etc,so presumably putting a ring through their snout would make wrooting extrmely painful.I have known people who have rough pasture land pen pigs on it,they apparently are better at conditioning the land than a rotivator.Anyway,buen camino,rest well tonight,you both deserve it

    Liked by 1 person

    • magwood says:

      Thank you David. I thought the same about the pigs. When walking in the mountains around my home I see the results of wild boar activity all around, they completely turn over the earth in their quest for underground goodies – I’m just glad they don’t find their way into my garden

      Like

  16. Pingback: Camino Mozárabe - Córdoba to Mérida • Nick and Angela

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