Camino Mozárabe (Camino Sanabrés) – day 45 – Ourense to Cea 22.5 km

I was late setting off this morning and then stopped for a hot drink – Paul’s laid-back influence. The journey out of the city was not as bad as the approach, but we were on the road for around 15 km. There are a series of bridges crossing the wide Rio Miño and our path took us over an ancient bridge, which I couldn’t photograph because of the poor angle I could see it from, but I took a lovely photo of the modern bridge a few hundred metres away.

At around 7 km I found myself climbing the most ridiculously steep hill – 19% for two km’s! It was a real killer – but there was nothing to do but keep putting one foot in front of the other, again and again and again. Eventually it evened out and soon after we came upon a resting place for pilgrims in the form of an old house, hosted by a charming and very talkative man who offered sustenance. I was served a delicious slice of sugary ‘eggy bread’ and a glass of his home made ecological wine, which was very good. A couple of villagers came and joined in the conversation for a while and it was all very pleasant.

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Soon after we started to walk on tracks, some of which were the remains of Roman roads (always hard on the feet) and we were led across a medieval bridge. Again, it was a short day that seemed quite long. Maybe I am getting to the end of my endurance. I certainly didn’t feel particularly refreshed from my relaxing thermal dip yesterday. But I saw a road sign today stating that Santiago is 79 km’s away.

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Here in the small town of Cea, the houses are in better repair than most small towns and villages and it is mostly very attractive. I felt it my duty to try a small portion of pulpo which was very nice. And I found a bar to send off yesterday’s post. I realise I omitted a photo of our previous night’s dinner, which I will include when I next get a chance (now done).

My guide says the Xunta albergue has been reported to be a bit dirty in the last year or so, and I can’t say that it was wrong. The accommodation is good, as in all Xunta albergues, but it is in need of a jolly good spring clean. The hospitalero reminds me of a dodgy character from an episode of ‘Only Fools and Horses’.

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There seems to be a large influx of new faces the last couple of days and I have put this down to the fact that Ourense is the starting point for pilgrims who want to walk the minimum distance (100+ km’s) to receive a compostela (certificate) – the equivalent of Sarria on the Camino Frances and Valença/Tui on the Camino Portuguese. The forty places in the albergues last night and today have been full. I have to say that I don’t like such crowds, although once walking, people spread out well enough and I don’t necessarily see anyone during the day.

I am undecided as to whether I shall reach Santiago in three or four more days. If four, then I will need to take a very short stage tomorrow. Let’s just wait and see what pans out. The end is definitely in sight and I shall be really glad to get back to some home comforts and familiar surroundings.

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Distance according to Wikiloc – 22.5 km
Accumulated elevation uphill 557 metres
Accumulated elevation downhill 217 metres
Total distance walked 1,226.6 km, average 27.3 km per day

About magwood

Trepidatious Traveller - camino blog is about preparing for and walking the Camino de Santiago. Many future pilgrims have found the blog useful and inspiring, and many who have no plans to walk the camino have simply enjoyed the dialogue http://www.magwood.me
This entry was posted in Camino de Santiago de Compostela, Camino Mozarabe, Camino Sanabrés, Via de la Plata and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Camino Mozárabe (Camino Sanabrés) – day 45 – Ourense to Cea 22.5 km

  1. Maggie Gardner says:

    Another amazing blog and you’re looking good in the photo. Whilst we have all loved following you on this adventure we miss you and it will be lovely to have you back with us all again!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Cathy Platin says:

    I have loved all your posts and will most miss waking up in the morning with my cup of coffee to see what your last day of walking was like. Thank you so much for all your postings and wonderful photos(they were such a great addition)… Enjoy the final stretch. Buen Trabajo!

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  3. janpow123 says:

    ‘The Long and Winding Road’, ‘Show Me the Way to go Home’ and ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ are just a few tunes that remind me of your situation at the moment Maggie! Yes I agree, your posts will be so missed but glad that your on ‘The Final Countdown’! Nearly there😊

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  4. Go, mag, go – not long now

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  5. Heather says:

    Hope you manage to keep going to the end Maggie, you sound tired. Dig deep and listen to some of those great tunes you’ve collected. Love Heather xxx

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  6. Frank Eichenlaub says:

    Just discovered your blog via Facebook,APOC page. Very interesting.,My wife and I completed the CF In 2002 and I did it again in 2012. We hiked the Ruta a couple of years ago finishing in Astorga. Last year we walked much of the Camino Mozárabe from Granada to Cordoba. Walking the a Ruta I think we met two other hikers. On the Mozárabe we met three. Good to see that you’ve lots of company. I’m interested in the route you took from Malaga north to Santa Cruz. What guide book did you use?

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    • magwood says:

      Thanks for the comment Frank. I didn’t use a guide, just info available on the internet. I will publish a list of resources after I have finished. I would appreciate it if you could recommend the blog on the SPOC page – I wrote blogs for the Frances, Portuguese and now the Mozarabe. Keep in touch for further info in the coming weeks.

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  7. What a horrendous hill. That must have taken stamina.

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  8. David Wolfe says:

    You sound very weary today and that steep hill must have been a killer. There is no doubt in my mind that you’ll keep going and your positive spirit will return. I am so looking forward to your return. It seems forever since I waved goodbye to you In Málaga, what you have achieved is something to be proud of and a mammoth undertaking, if you include the walk from Canillas de Albaida to Málaga and the additional 100 km to Finisterre you will have walked in excess of 1400 km that is incredible and I’m so proud of you. The pictures are so good it must have been a boost to see a road sign for Santiago. Have a good day tomorrow I’ll be thinking of you.

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  9. It’s been a long trek but this has been a superb walk from what I’ve read, physically speaking. Yes, you are possibly winding down a bit but it won’t be long now. ❤ ❤

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  10. Sue Lyons says:

    What an amazing lady you are, it’s fantastic to follow your journey and I too love to read your blog with my morning cuppa, not far to go now and I can see that you’re very pleased about that..keep going!

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  11. Keith Rocks says:

    Good luck with the final few days Maggie. Love reading your blog. And love the photos.

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  12. Kristina Wilkening says:

    You are a super trooper! I love the pix of the rocky villages, stairways and green paths.
    Maybe it is time to crank the music up a notch or two! :}

    Like

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